Feta, asparagus and lentil salad

HMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

SALAD IN 10 MINUTES C/O GOUSTO

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/recipes/salad-how-to-make-quickly-feta-asparagus-lentil-fast-ingredients-a8245731.html

Feta, asparagus and lentil salad

100g Greek feta cheese
1 tsp Dijon mustard
15ml white wine vinegar
50g wild rocket
250g black beluga lentils (ready to eat)
120g asparagus spears
1 lemon
125g baby plum tomatoes
15g pumpkin seeds

Heat a large wide-based pan with a matching lid over a medium heat. Meanwhile chop the asparagus in half. Once hot, add the asparagus to the pan with a pinch of salt and splash of cold water. Cover and cook for 3-4 minutes or until bright green and tender with a slight bite. Once done, remove from the heat and set aside until serving.

Meanwhile, chop the baby plum tomatoes in half. Add the chopped tomatoes and washed rocket to a large mixing bowl. Cook the beluga lentils in the microwave according to pack instructions.

Meanwhile, crumble the feta cheese into rough, bite-sized pieces. Combine the Dijon mustard, white wine vinegar, the juice of ½ lemon and 3 tbsp of olive oil. Season with a pinch of salt and pepper – this is your lemony dressing. Added the cooked lentils to the bowl of tomatoes and rocket with the lemony dressing and give everything a good mix up – this is your lentil salad. Cut the remaining lemon into wedges.

Serve the lentil salad on the table to share. Top with the asparagus, crumbled feta, pumpkin seeds and lemon wedges. Season with a grind of black pepper and let everyone dig in.

Recipe from Gousto.co.uk’s new Ten to Table range

colour vibrant and light

The pictures are not showing here
SO check the link
But what a story of people who through the design and creativity of the Emerati women and the artisans that created these pieces demonstrate

https://www.thenational.ae/lifestyle/fashion/a-glimpse-at-the-colorful-history-of-emirati-fashion-1.710012?mc_cid=36770d3b72&mc_eid=3d6a322047

A glimpse at the colorful history of Emirati fashion
We get a first look at a series of limited-edition prints featuring traditional Emirati outfits from Reem El Mutwalli’s historic Sultani collection

Melanie Hunt
March 4, 2018

Look 2: riot of colour. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
Look 2: riot of colour. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
Where to buy

Limited-edition art prints of The Sofa Series: Sultani can be acquired from Reem El Mutwalli at www.reemelmutwalli.com

Ask any woman what she was wearing at key points in her life, and she’ll probably be able to tell you. Just as photographs, artworks and other souvenirs can evoke memories, a woman’s wardrobe can catalogue her personal history, while also more broadly reflecting the life and times in which she lived.

Reem El Mutwalli, who has previously described herself as a “scholar who happens to design”, has gathered and curated a collection of more than 170 Emirati dresses, many of which have been worn by members of the UAE’s royal families. The gorgeous fabrics, colours, weaving, embroidery and embellishments of the Sultani collection (named after a striped opaque silk that is popular in the region), provide fascinating insight into the UAE’s identity.

With the aim of making these exquisite pieces accessible to a wider audience, and providing a window into “the expression of a society’s character and history, indicating aspects of its culture, heritage and prevailing attitude”, El Mutwalli recently collaborated with Omani photographer Issa Saleh Al Kindy, to produce a series of limited-edition photographic prints called The Sofa Series: Sultani. These feature four different pieces from the collection, complete with accessories, modelled by El Mutwalli’s daughter Mae Noaf, seated on a velvet sofa in her mother’s home.

“Both parties are avid connoisseurs of culture and art,” says the designer of the collaboration. “Both [of us] understand the imperative need to accurately document and preserve such garments. And we both appreciate that many lovers of art, UAE heritage and culture, would like to keep a token of such articles of history, but cannot possibly acquire the original garment,” she adds.

El Mutwalli has previously collaborated with artists, events and institutions on unique installations or exhibits featuring select pieces from the Sultani collection. The fragile and embellished nature of many of the fabrics mean that the number of displays, not to mention their duration, needs to be limited, in order to preserve this collection for future generations. “These are articles of delicate fabrics that are hard to collect, due to an earlier un-sedentary lifestyle,” she says. “People here have a culture of giving away or recycling their old garments.”

The dresses in the collection date from the early 1950s, and are a culmination of 25 years of El Mutwalli’s efforts. Sultani fabric is unique and cannot be replicated. “It represents my humble appreciation and is an act of giving back to a culture that I grew up in, and a history I have individually witnessed,” she explains.

Look 1: modern design

Look 1: modern design. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
Look 1: modern design. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
This dress began with a hand-painted portrait of Sheikh Zayed, the Founding Father, by Sheikha Alyazia bint Nahyan Al Nahyan, who was an aspiring artist at the time. Her mother, Sheikha Fakhira bint Saeed Al Nahyan, then designed the blue chiffon garment to complement the artwork, with the addition of detailed embroidery and embellishment work, which was carried out by skilled artisans. It provides an example of the unification of two traditional articles of dress (the thobe and the kandura) into one, which is the norm nowadays as the kandura evolved into the inner slip of the thobe and is generally attached to it, at the neckline. It was worn on many occasions by Sheikha Alyazia and was ultimately donated to the Sultani collection.

Look 2: riot of colour

Look 2: riot of colour. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
Look 2: riot of colour. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
This ensemble embodies key elements of traditional UAE dress and dates back to around 1984. A burqa or face mask covers most of the wearer’s facial features. The shayla is made from black cotton gauze, which reflects an earlier style of this type of headscarf. Here, it engulfs most of the body to create an extra layer of concealment when combined with a thobe (the term used for a loose-fitting, formal over-garment). The body of the thobe is made up of coloured panels of lightly patterned chiffon. Traditional Emirati “teli”, or embroidery work, sees silver thread intertwined with monocoloured cotton, forming a lace pattern at the neckline. The kandura, an inner tunic dress, is made from traditional striped opaque silk known as sultani. Sirwal, or printed cotton underpants, are decorated at the ankle cuffs with teli work. All these articles were traditionally worn together in an array of mismatched textures and colours.

Look 3: bridal finery

Look 3: bridal finery. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
Look 3: bridal finery. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
Sheikha Hamda bint Mohammed Al Nahyan, maternal aunt to the President, Sheikh Khalifa, commissioned this dress as a gift to El Mutwalli and instructed the late Fatima bint Saad, a well-known palace dressmaker, to base the design on the style of her own wedding dress. The dress is embroidered on the neckline, central axis and sleeve cuffs with pure gold discs, some of which resemble embossed gold coins.

Look 4: fancy threads

Look 4: fancy threads. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
Look 4: fancy threads. Courtesy Issa Saleh AlKindy
Also from the 1980s, this brocade silk chiffon dress features metallic thread from Japan, which was introduced to the region around this time. The thobe is worn over the kandura. It is embellished with teli work, which has been applied to the neckline and sleeve cuffs. The dress was previously worn by Sheikha Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan, wife of Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces. El Mutwalli saw it being worn on numerous social and official occasions before it was eventually donated to the Sultani collection.

LOCAL GAZELLE ON SALE IN LU LU

in:
Banana Recipes, Beef Recipes, Curry Recipes, and 6 more
Curried Gazelle
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Description Edit
This land-locked Central African country once thrived on its copper reserves, which are now dwindling. Farming methods are primitive, using bush-fallow cultivation methods, but the potential of agricultural expansion is promising. Peasant farmers grow the bulk of local foodstuffs but there is little surplus for sale so that currently a great deal of food is imported. In the bush the hunter can rely on a more substantial meal.
Zambia is renowned for its prolific wild life, with large game parks teeming with classic African animals such as the elephant, lion, leopard, giraffe, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, zebra, antelope and many more.

Serves 4.
Ingredients Edit
1 kg of gazelle rump steak, or beef chump steak cut into bite-size cubes
2 onions, chopped
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 large chilies, seeded and finely chopped (minced)
2 plantains or bananas, sliced
1 tbsp tomato paste
1 tbsp seedless raisins
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground cardamom
½ tsp turmeric
½ tsp paprika
2 tsp mild curry powder
1 tbsp vegetable oil
300 ml coconut milk

Directions
Lightly sauté the onions in the oil for 3 minutes and then add garlic.
Taste. If it tastes sweet, add more garlic.
Fry for 1 minute then add chillies, frying for another 3 minutes.
Add steak and brown on all sides. Add the tomato paste, raisins, curry powder and spices, stirring.
Pour in the coconut milk and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to simmer and add plantains.
Cook, covered, for another 30 minutes. Test occasionally to ensure the liquid has not boiled away too much – there should be a rich sauce.

Serve curry on a bed of rice.

AFRICA SHE IS MATURING

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-43240809

Brands out of AFRICA

BRILLIANT
So happy to see this change taking place
UAE are doing it for themselves also

Times are changing

delicious chick pea salad [borrowed]

Tomato Chickpea Salad
Serves 4

For the salad:
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 (15-ounce) can garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed
Kosher salt
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 pints cherry tomatoes, halved
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
For the vinaigrette:
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon minced shallot
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
For the salad:
Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the beans and spread out into a single layer. Cook without stirring until lightly browned on the bottom, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir, add a big pinch of salt, and spread the beans out again. Cook for another 2 minutes, then stir and spread out again as needed, until golden-brown and blistered on all sides. From start to finish, this will take about 6 to 7 minutes total.

Remove from the heat, add the cumin, and toss to coat. While the chickpeas are cooking, make the vinaigrette.

For the vinaigrette:
Whisk the oil, vinegar, shallot, a pinch of salt, and a few grinds of black pepper together in a large bowl.

Add the chickpeas, tomatoes, and parsley to the vinaigrette. Toss everything to combine. Taste and adjust seasoning, adding more salt and pepper as needed.

Recipe Notes
Storage: Leftovers can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

UAE Organ doning

Strangely enough was only having this very conversation yesterday and here is a piece in the National

It is something that i feel strongly about and have inserted in my will although neither of my children are in agreement
It seems to me only reasonable to provide what is useful to others who will then ahve a better quality of life or life itself.
I can see the concern about ethics but still feel that nurse’s and doctors do their best for us not themselves
And this is an honourable gift to another.
Read below and see what you think.

UAE’s largest organ unit receiving calls ‘every day’ from prospective donors
Abu Dhabi hospital has 250 patients on waiting with list no relative that is a match

Shireena Al Nowais

February 18, 2018
Surgeons perform the UAE’s first full heart transplant at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi. Photo Courtesy: Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi
Surgeons perform the UAE’s first full heart transplant at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi. Photo Courtesy: Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi
How Islam’s view of posthumous transplant surgery changed

Transplants from the deceased have been carried out in hospitals across the globe for decades, but in some countries in the Middle East, including the UAE, the practise was banned until relatively recently.

Opinion has been divided as to whether organ donations from a deceased person is permissible in Islam.

The body is viewed as sacred, during and after death, thus prohibiting cremation and tattoos.

One school of thought viewed the removal of organs after death as equally impermissible.

That view has largely changed, and among scholars and indeed many in society, to be seen as permissible to save another life.

The UAE’s largest transplant centre is receiving calls “every day” from prospective donors, providing hope to hundreds of patients on a waiting list for new organs.

Doctors at Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) said they have been encouraged by the number of members of the public that have come forward to volunteer to give their organs in the event of their death.

The hospital has conducted four kidney transplants from deceased donors to living patients since a change in the law last year made the procedure possible for the first time.

It also intends to branch out from just kidney operations this year.

But with 1,100 people currently on dialysis and 200 new patients every year in government hospitals, medics want to spread awareness and promote a culture of donating organs.

“There are many people with organ failure in this country, so our job is to promote transplantation and let people know that there are options available,” said Dr Mohamed Al Seiari, consultant physician and a nephrologist at SKMC.

“To my surprise though, there are many families who want to donate. Every day we receive calls from people who want to donate after their death. There is an evident change in culture, but we still need further education and to spread the word.”

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates – February 18th, 2018: Mohamed Yahya Al Seiari (Consultant Physician Nephrology). Organ donations and patients on waiting list for donations. Sunday, February 18th, 2018. Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi. Chris Whiteoak / The National
Consultant physician Dr Mohamed Yahya Al Seiari said more and more members of the public are volunteering to donate their organs in the event of their death. Chris Whiteoak / The National
He gave an example of the Emirati parents of a four-year-old boy who died recently.

“Their son was just declared dead and they immediately told us to take his organs. They said that they didn’t want to go feeling that their son’s life has gone to waste. They literally fought with us to take their son’s organs after he was declared dead at the hospital.”

But the recent change means tha tthe UAE is starting a donor programme from scratch.

The deceased donor list is open to nationals and non UAE nationals in the UAE.

However, talks are still going on about the mechanism and how and where people can register to be donors.

Current procedures include hospital staff visiting emergency units and approaching families of eligible donors.

“As times passes and the registry develops, people will understand this concept more and be more than willing to donate,” said Dr Mohammed Badar Zaman, head of transplant and liver Surgery at SKMC.

“In the meantime, the way that it happens is that when someone dies in a hospital, and is confirmed dead, then someone approaches the family to ask for consent.”

He said there is a need to create a larger pool of potential donors.

“Every year 200 new patients are added to that list, so the number of patients who need to be transplanted in this country is quite high,” he said.

Everything you need to know about the UAE’s organ donor transplant programme

Boy gets new lease on life after successful kidney transplant in Abu Dhabi

He said the waiting list for organs reflects the general population, most are expats.

“It is well distributed amongst all nationalities but what we have noticed is that in the past couple of years, there has been a steady rise of Emiratis coming forward for transplantation,” he said.

Dr Mohammed Badar Zaman said a system will soon allow people to identify themselves as a donor, though it is not known if that will involve carrying a card, for example, as in some countries.

“The message is that soon the Department of Health will set up a registry, so national policies and procedures can be set out out,” he said.

“We have actively started the programme at SKMC for anyone who needs a transplant and does not have a living related donor.

“Anyone who wishes to register or needs a transplant can do so without discrimination. Anyone who wishes to donate their organs can contact us directly.

“Transplants are for anyone and everybody who is living in the UAE – whether a UAE national or not.”

what it is to be other and not who we think we are

Growing up as an army ‘brat’ we lived in many places and it wasn’t until I lived here that I had been in any one country for more than 2 maybe 3 years. I have now lived in UAE for more years than I have ever lived anywhere in my entire life. I am currently in my second Emirate and living in the second of the homes I have spent the most of my life in…. UAE since 1995 and how much change and development have we both grown through.
Having just read Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche AMERICANAH and been carried along in a very unexpected way I had to write something to myself and anyone else who might be interested.
I always knew I was white in the various countries I grew up but had never had that experience; she so well describes of finding out I was white! [Often called www as in ‘wicked witch of the west’ and ‘white western woman’] usually tongue in cheek. But as we know many a truth is said in jest. In her case arriving in America and then when Dike visits Nigeria and Lagos for the first time as a young man. The idea of African American and American African was quite remarkable to me but makes immense sense. I have watched Morgan Freeman interviewed on this topic and his response makes sense to me. He is an American and no he does not want is history celebrated in one month he wants it to be celebrated and he is correct. In the same way that Arabs would appreciate having their history and contributions recognised rather than obliterated by the great white
People of USA more than anywhere I have ever experiences are apparently obsessed with ethnicity. More so than my own country which alarms me.
Here in UAE I began to have some limited idea about being marginalised for race, gender an more recently age.

There is a whole different range and variation on the Arabs and whether you are GCC or MENA, from the Levant and indeed many Syrians do not consider theme selves Arabs at all
A saying here is you can take ”the Arab out of the country but you can not take the Arab out of the man”

Reflecting back on Occupational Therapy training and then working in the health service also social services I am now struck by how many people were living this life in the shadows as described by Obinze and how various friends, relatives ahve fared. Young men in particular who came from backgrounds that’Vincent’ would consider soft and privileged. Obinze describes when being deported the unnecessary humiliation and degradation he was subjected to because he wanted a choice for education. So many are now forced to make choices for their lives let alone to experience education and God forbid families, social stability and security.
Here in UAE their are also many and not just from Africa but all nationals of this world living between residency and visitor status. Desperate to stay and live this life of a country that invests in it’s people and expatriates wanting to make their lives here unlike that described by Ifemelu and her first experiences of jobs and ID cards!
And now TRUMPS USA! Boris and MAY’S UK….
Imagine having a choice and USA would be the better choice than your own country – to leave and be forever treated as other is too momentous and indeed monstrous to consider.

This book has been quite a journey for me and remarkable and in some instances revelationery in how connected I feel although I am not from Nigeria and have not traveled [or will ever travel] to USA.

Thank you for the journey and partial arrival

NB. These opinions and thoughts are entirely my own

children are not an insurance policy at any time in your life

I came across this item in today’s BBC World
http://www.bbc.com/news/stories-42665317

And was intrigued by it
My elderly aunt never married and never had children that anyone knows about she lives in the North and is now 98
No one of her peer group is still alive and there were never any family where she chose to live and work.
She has retired to her room in residential care and no longer goes to the dining or recreation room. As she does not want to experience the humiliation of incontinence herself or witness another bearing the humiliation.
She reads, watches her favourite programs and that’s the sum of her day.
Occasionally she will pick up the phone when you call but her hearing is not good and she hates the hearing aid
Last time my youngest sister and I took our mother, her sister in law to visit they sat and traded health issues!
Until we said please is this a competition or can we talk about something else?
I cried inside whilst there and then cried unashamedly later.
It was heart breaking but then whom am I to say she is content enough. Chats to the carer’s and knows the teams they favour and the results!
It is not what I have in mind for myself

Children or niece’s and nephews are not an insurance policy

”I didn’t want to go to a pub and have unprotected sex with someone who’d had no STD checks
She had wanted children since she turned 30 and was envious of friends who were starting families. She was also shaken by a visit to her aunt in hospital. Her aunt didn’t have children, and Jessica believed she had been ignored by doctors as there had been no-one to insist on better care.
“I thought there was a risk of me ending up in a similar situation if I had no kids of my own. They can act as insurance for when you get older.””

Mother is now in her 91st year and has resided in a fab mini copy of her home with Daddy [Daddy departed in December 2013]for these past two years
There is a 24 hour alarm and carer’s come in daily
This doesn’t mean that she is ‘safe’ but she has her own home with her furniture and things of importance around her.
Again children are not an insurance policy

I have two children and relationships are difficult with more than 8 hours flight time between us all and it is me that is outside UK.Believe me they are definitely not an Insurance Policy

As Khalil Jibran says and I quote the opening stanza with which i agree

”They are not your children
They are the sons’ and daughters of life’s longing itself
They come through you but not from you
And though they are with you they belong not to you”

Your children are not yours they are theirs and will live their lives not yours.

How do you see yourself ? & how do others describe or see you?

It is the first day of a new year 2018 to be exact
And I was thinking over this past year
My late father always called December 31st OLD YEAR’S Night and i have tended to follow this tradition whimsical as it may appear. I have always thought of News Year Eve being tonight the first night of the new year!

I had a weird experience when calling to greet friends for Christmas in a different time zone and unfortunately hear myself being described as ”Peculiar and very difficult….” I was somewhat hurt

Then I reflected and remembered being described as eccentric late last year as in 2016! And at the time being indignant as I had only heard the word used in a negative context.
So I looked it up and found ‘yes’ indeed I am ‘eccentric’ ALHAMDIL’ALLAH and happy to be this way.
I live out near the mountains, I am unconventional, I travel to places such as Kabul Afghanistan or Erbil Kurdistan to try and make a small difference. Despite safety and security issues.
Life is for living and not a rehearsal and this has been brought home in many ways with extreme health and also early death for people I know well or friends of mine. Big reality check to value what we have.
‘Wanting what we have not wanting what we haven’t and desiring unreachable, unnecessary items’

Some ways of describing ‘eccentric’ are below for your enlightenment

eccentric
ɪkˈsɛntrɪk,ɛkˈsɛntrɪk/Submit
adjective
1.
(of a person or their behaviour) unconventional and slightly strange.
“he noted her eccentric appearance”
synonyms: unconventional, uncommon, abnormal, irregular, aberrant, anomalous, odd, queer, strange, peculiar, weird, bizarre, off-centre, outlandish, freakish, extraordinary; idiosyncratic, quirky, singular, nonconformist, capricious, whimsical; outré, avant garde; informalway out, far out, offbeat, dotty, nutty, screwy, freaky, oddball, wacky, cranky, off the wall, madcap, zany; informalrum; informalkooky, wacko, bizarro, in left field
“they were worried by his eccentric behaviour”
2.
technical
not placed centrally or not having its axis or other part placed centrally.
“a servo driving an eccentric cam”
noun
1.
a person of unconventional and slightly strange views or behaviour.
“he’s seen as a local eccentric”
synonyms: oddity, odd fellow, unorthodox person, character, individualist, individual, free spirit, misfit; More
2.
a disc or wheel mounted eccentrically on a revolving shaft in order to transform rotation into backward-and-forward motion, e.g. a cam in an internal combustion engine.

We don’t always know what other people think of us and does it in fact matter

What ever we do we need to be real and true as this is our legacy.
I often say that I may compromise my integrity but I will never compromise my morals

Wishing everyone a safe secure and healthy 2018
Live as if it is your last day